The Product Design Special Collections

A general introduction has been given on the Product Design Special Collection in order to start looking and understand how designers were thinking on different aspects, and broadening our recognition, either by using innovative materials or by re inventing new products using various manufacturing techniques. Behind each piece a story, which gives it value and meaning, taken in consideration while been purchased by the consumers.

Five pieces were the most interesting, in term of manufacturing techniques, design process and the use of new materials.

 

1. Bowl made out of mycelium by Officina Corpuscoli

picture1
Figure 1: A Bowl made out of mycelium by Corpuscoli.

Growing products is the new revolution for sustainability and habitat. Montalti’s studio Officina Corpuscoil is experimenting new techniques to produce alternatives to plastics using fungal organisms. He claims that It’s a paradigm based on cultivation (dezeen, 2015).

“It’s about envisaging a completely different paradigm in relation to production.” Mentality


 

2. Coral pendant lamp by David Trubridge

picture2
Figure 2: Coral Pendant Lamp by David Trubridge
coral-packaging
Figure 3: The packaging of the lamp components.

The coral pendant lamp is Inspire from nature, it contains one single component repeated 60 times, made of bamboo plywood. The idea behind it is the interaction between the product and the customer, where it is constructed by hand one at a time. One of the difficulties faced the designer during transporting the lighting unit is shipping it without being damaged. There fore he created the idea of transporting it disassembled and being re-installed by the customer (Trubridge, n.d. ).


 

3. Printed Ceramic Vase By Olivier Van Herpt

untitled.png
Figure4: The printed ceramic vase by Herpt.

A unique movement in the world of pottery is been established by Olivier Van Herpt in 2012. The 3D printing ceramics technology were existing but it couldn’t produce a human scale things. Therefore, he experimented various types of clays, and after two years finally he discovered  functional 3D printed ceramics  that can make larger scale of ceramics(Herpt, 2014).

These 3D printers allows to manufacture different forms, colors and textures, but on the other hand it replaced humans with a machine (Herpt, 2012-2013).


 

4. Blow Away Vase By Front

front_1

picture9
Figure 5: the process in designing The Blow Away vase using 3D software.

Using a 3D software, a Royal Delft vase has been digitalized and added some parameters to the material, then it was exposed to a simulated wind. the prints on the vase is hand made, and it is available in Moooi. (today and tomorrow, 2009).


5. The Gravity Stool by Jólan van der Wiel

 

Picture10.png
Figure 6: The Gravity stool, each piece is unique.

In order to create those innovative pieces of furniture, Jólan uses magnetic plastic compounds, magnets and simple gravity, to represent a frozen moment of physics exposing the forces in action. (arch daily, 2012).


 

All the previous pieces common in collaborating the use of technology and expanding the material use, as  Jólan  van der Wiel says: “future potential in the joined cooperative forces combining technology with natural phenomena.”

 


 

Reference List:

  1. Hobson, B. (2015) Growing products from fungus could be the start of a “biotechnological revolution”. Dezeen and MINI Frontiers. Retrieved from: https://www.dezeen.com/2015/01/21/movie-officina-corpuscoli-growing-products-materials-fungus-biotechnological-revolution/
  2. Trubridge, D. (n.d.) Coral. [Online website] Retrieved from: https://www.davidtrubridge.com/collection/lighting/coral/
  3. Herpt, O. (2014) Functional 3D Printed Ceramics [Online website] Retrieved from:http://oliviervanherpt.com/functional-3d-printed-ceramics/
  4. Today and tomorrow (2009) Blow Away vase by Front [Online website] Retrieved from: http://www.todayandtomorrow.net/2009/04/22/blow-away-vase-by-front/
  5. Basulto, D. (2012) The Gravity Stool by Jólan van der Wiel, magnetic innovation [Online website] Retrieved from: http://www.archdaily.com/201154/the-gravity-stool-by-jolan-van-der-wiel-magnetic-innovation

Figures List:

  1. Hobson, B. (2015) Growing products from fungus could be the start of a “biotechnological revolution”. [Online image] [Accessed 10th November 2016] Available at <https://www.dezeen.com/2015/01/21/movie-officina-corpuscoli-growing-products-materials-fungus-biotechnological-revolution/&gt;
  2. Trubridge, D. (n.d.) Coral. [Online image] [Accessed 10th November 2016] Available at <https://www.davidtrubridge.com/collection/lighting/coral/&gt;
  3. Battista, A. (2016) The Art and Craft of 3D Printed Clay [Online image] [Accessed 20th November 2016] Available at <http://oliviervanherpt.com/functional-3d-printed-ceramics/>
  4. Today and tomorrow (2009) Blow Away vase by Front [Online image] [Accessed 11th November 2016] Available at <http://www.todayandtomorrow.net/2009/04/22/blow-away-vase-by-front/&gt;
  5. Basulto, D. (2012) The Gravity Stool by Jólan van der Wiel, magnetic innovation [Online image] [Accessed 11th November 2016] Available at <http://www.archdaily.com/201154/the-gravity-stool-by-jolan-van-der-wiel-magnetic-innovation&gt;

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s